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You Searched for " [WORD]-homeopathy"
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RESEARCH LETTER: Antiinflammatory activity of two Ayurvedic formulations containing guggul
MS Bagul, H Srinivasa, NS Kanaki, M Rajani
Indian Journal of Pharmacology, Year 2005, Volume 37, Issue 6 [p. 399-400]
DOI: 10.4103/0253-7613.19080
INVITED ARTICLE: Homeopathy-The science of holistic healing: An overview
Husain Attarwala, Deepak Bathija, Ayesha Akhil, Blessy Philip, Anitha Mathew, KK Mueen Ahmed
Pharmacognosy Magazine, Year 2006, Volume 2, Issue 5 [p. 7-14]
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RESEARCH PAPER: In vivo and in vitro effects of the Canova medicine on experimental infection wi...
G Takahachi, MLF Maluf, TIE Svidzinski, MMO Dalalio, CA Bersani-Amado, RKN Cuman
Indian Journal of Pharmacology, Year 2006, Volume 38, Issue 5 [p. 350-354]
DOI: 10.4103/0253-7613.27704
Objective: To evaluate the in vivo and in vitro activity of Canova in experimental infection with Paracoccidioides brasiliensis. Materials and Methods: Mice infected with P. brasiliensis were treated with Canova for 17 weeks. Follow-up measures included the determination of total antibodies, global and differential leukocyte counts. Further, nitric oxide production was determined by adding macrophage cultures to different concentrations of Canova in the presence or absence of P. brasiliensis. Results: The data revealed the protective effect of Canova in P. brasiliensis- infected animals. A higher nitric oxide production was found in the Canova- treated cultures. Conclusion: These data suggest that Canova activates the macrophages by a way that depends, at least in part, on nitric oxide.
ABSTRACTS: Abstracts of 59th Annual National Conference of Indian Psychiatric Society
Indian Psychiatric Society
Indian Journal of Psychiatry, Year 2007, Volume 49, Issue 5 [p. 1-60]
RESEARCH LETTER: Allopathic vs. ayurvedic practices in tertiary care institutes of urban North India
Ujala Verma, Rashmi Sharma, Pankaj Gupta, Samta Gupta, Bhuvneshvar Kapoor
Indian Journal of Pharmacology, Year 2007, Volume 39, Issue 1 [p. 52-54]
DOI: 10.4103/0253-7613.30765
ORIGINAL ARTICLE: A study on acceptability of Indian system of medicine and homeopathy in India: Results from the s...
RJ Yadav, A Pandey, P Singh
Indian Journal of Public Health, Year 2007, Volume 51, Issue 1 [p. 47-49]
 PMID: 18232142
Objectives: Institute for Research in Medical Statistics, Indian Council of Medical Research, Delhi undertook a study to obtain all India estimate of utilization of Indian Systems of Medicine and Homeopathy (ISM&H). Methods: The study covered 35 districts spreading over 19 States of India. In this article, results for the State of West Bengal are being presented. Selected districts in West Bengal were Midnapore and Darjeeling where about 2400 sick persons from 2000 households were studied. Results: About 20% sick persons actually availed ISM&H treatment in the State. Majority availed Homeopathy followed by Ayurvedic medicines. Use of Unani and Siddha is negligible in this State. In case of minor ailments, ISM&H was preferred by about 15% in Darjeeling district and 42% in Midnapore district. In case of serious illnesses, about 12% in Darjeeling district preferred ISM&H, but very few (about 5%) preferred this in Midnapore. 39.4% and 20.8% of sick persons sought treatment from traditional healers in Midnapore and Darjeeling district respectively. Jaundice, snakebite, dog bite and 'bone setting' were some of the conditions for which traditional healers were mostly visited. Sizable proportion (30%-89%) of sick persons used various 'kitchen remedies' for conditions like indigestion, loose motion, constipation, fever, body ache, sprain and cough & cold.
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SPECIAL ARTICLE: Effect of common herbal medicines on patients undergoing anaesthesia
Yatindra Kumar Batra, Subramanyam Rajeev
Indian Journal of Anaesthesia, Year 2007, Volume 51, Issue 3 [p. 184-192]
Herbal medicines are the oldest known remedies to mankind. Herbs have been used by all cultures throughout history but India has one of the oldest, and most diverse cultural living traditions associated with the use of medicinal plants. The use of these agents may have perioperative implications, which often is a result of various factors. The constituents of these medications may not be adequately described. Conventional agents like ste­roids, oral hypoglycaemic agent, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents and antihistamines are frequently added to herbal medicines. Toxic materials like arsenic, mercury, lead, etc. have been detected from time to time in some herbs. The use of herbal medicines can result in drug interactions, most of which are less well defined. The interactions that are most important in the perioperative period include sympathomimetic, sedative, and coagulopathic effects. Less than 50% of patients admit to taking these medicines, which compounds the prob­lem. It is imperative that anaesthesiologists obtain a history of herbal medicine use from patients and anticipate the adverse drug interactions. In case of any doubt, it may be prudent to stop these herbal medicines atleast 2­3 weeks prior to anaesthesia and surgery.
ORIGINAL ARTICLE: Knowledge, attitude, and practices with regard to epilepsy in rural north-west India
RK Sureka, Rohit Sureka
Annals of Indian Academy of Neurology, Year 2007, Volume 10, Issue 3 [p. 160-164]
DOI: 10.4103/0972-2327.34795
Objectives: To study the knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs about the causes and the treatment of epilepsy in rural North West India in the year 2000 and, again after 4 years, to study the effects of health education and regular treatment on the same parameters. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted twice, in 2000 and 2004. A structured questionnaire was used to collect information on demographic profile, seizure characteristics, knowledge regarding cause of epilepsy, details of alternative forms of treatment taken, and attitude towards medical treatment. Results: Generalized seizures were the most common (84%) type of seizure, followed by partial seizures (9.4%). The most common antiepileptic drug used was phenytoin, followed by phenobarbitone. Ayurvedic treatment was the most common alternative therapy used. Evil spirits were believed to be the cause of the disease by 26.4% of the patients in 2000, but only in 11.2% in 2004. Faith in the curative power of drugs increased from 18% in 2000 to 59% in the year 2004. Polytherapy was being resorted to by 60% of patients in 2000; this was reduced to 45.6% in 2004. Conclusion: Positive attitude changes over the four years from 2000 to 2004 confirm the need for effective health education that can remove misconcepts regarding disease.
ORIGINAL ARTICLE: Influence of yoga on mood states, distress, quality of life and immune outcomes in early stage br...
Raghavendra M Rao, HR Nagendra, Nagarathna Raghuram, C Vinay, S Chandrashekara, KS Gopinath, BS Srinath
International Journal of Yoga, Year 2008, Volume 1, Issue 1 [p. 11-20]
DOI: 10.4103/0973-6131.36789 PMID: 21829279
Context : Breast cancer patients awaiting surgery experience heightened distress that could affect postoperative outcomes. Aims : The aim of our study was to evaluate the effects of yoga intervention on mood states, treatment-related symptoms, quality of life and immune outcomes in breast cancer patients undergoing surgery. Settings and Design : Ninety-eight recently diagnosed stage II and III breast cancer patients were recruited for a randomized controlled trial comparing the effects of a yoga program with supportive therapy plus exercise rehabilitation on postoperative outcomes following surgery. Materials and Methods : Subjects were assessed prior to surgery and four weeks thereafter. Psychometric instruments were used to assess self-reported anxiety, depression, treatment-related distress and quality of life. Blood samples were collected for enumeration of T lymphocyte subsets (CD4 %, CD8 % and natural killer (NK) cell % counts) and serum immunoglobulins (IgG, IgA and IgM). Statistical Analysis Used : We used analysis of covariance to compare interventions postoperatively. Results : Sixty-nine patients contributed data to the current analysis (yoga n = 33, control n = 36). The results suggest a significant decrease in the state ( P = 0.04) and trait ( P = 0.004) of anxiety, depression ( P = 0.01), symptom severity ( P = 0.01), distress ( P < 0.01) and improvement in quality of life ( P = 0.01) in the yoga group as compared to the controls. There was also a significantly lesser decrease in CD 56% ( P = 0.02) and lower levels of serum IgA ( P = 0.001) in the yoga group as compared to controls following surgery. Conclusions : The results suggest possible benefits for yoga in reducing postoperative distress and preventing immune suppression following surgery.
ORIGINAL ARTICLE: Influence of yoga on postoperative outcomes and wound healing in early operable breast cancer pat...
Raghavendra M Rao, HR Nagendra, Nagarathna Raghuram, C Vinay, S Chandrashekara, KS Gopinath, BS Srinath
International Journal of Yoga, Year 2008, Volume 1, Issue 1 [p. 33-41]
DOI: 10.4103/0973-6131.36795 PMID: 21829282
Context : Pre- and postoperative distress in breast cancer patients can cause complications and delay recovery from surgery. Objective : The aim of our study was to evaluate the effects of yoga intervention on postoperative outcomes and wound healing in early operable breast cancer patients undergoing surgery. Methods : Ninety-eight recently diagnosed stage II and III breast cancer patients were recruited in a randomized controlled trial comparing the effects of a yoga program with supportive therapy and exercise rehabilitation on postoperative outcomes and wound healing following surgery. Subjects were assessed at the baseline prior to surgery and four weeks later. Sociodemographic, clinical and investigative notes were ascertained in the beginning of the study. Blood samples were collected for estimation of plasma cytokines-soluble Interleukin (IL)-2 receptor (IL-2R), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and interferon (IFN)-gamma. Postoperative outcomes such as the duration of hospital stay and drain retention, time of suture removal and postoperative complications were ascertained. We used independent samples t test and nonparametric Mann Whitney U tests to compare groups for postoperative outcomes and plasma cytokines. Regression analysis was done to determine predictors for postoperative outcomes. Results : Sixty-nine patients contributed data to the current analysis (yoga: n = 33, control: n = 36). The results suggest a significant decrease in the duration of hospital stay ( P = 0.003), days of drain retention ( P = 0.001) and days for suture removal ( P = 0.03) in the yoga group as compared to the controls. There was also a significant decrease in plasma TNF alpha levels following surgery in the yoga group ( P < 0.001), as compared to the controls. Regression analysis on postoperative outcomes showed that the yoga intervention affected the duration of drain retention and hospital stay as well as TNF alpha levels. Conclusion : The results suggest possible benefits of yoga in reducing postoperative complications in breast cancer patients.
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